Flying with Eustachian Tube Dysfunction: Best Tips

Flying with Eustachian Tube Dysfunction

When faced with the decision of whether to Flying with Eustachian Tube Dysfunction, it’s crucial to consider the potential risks and complications that may arise during the journey. At [Your Company], we understand the importance of making informed decisions about your health, especially when it comes to conditions affecting the ears during air travel.

Understanding the Connection

Airplane travel involves changes in air pressure, which can have a significant impact on individuals with severe ear infections. The eustachian tubes, responsible for equalizing pressure in the ears, may face challenges, leading to discomfort and potential complications.

Risks and Challenges

1. Increased Pain and Discomfort
Flying with a severe ear infection can intensify pain and discomfort due to the pressure changes during takeoff and landing.

2. Potential Worsening of Infection
The confined space and recycled air on airplanes create an environment conducive to the spread of infections. Individuals with severe ear infections may face an increased risk of exacerbating their condition.

Expert Recommendations

Before making any travel decisions, it is imperative to consult with a qualified medical professional, preferably an ear, nose, and throat (ENT) specialist. They can assess the severity of the infection and provide personalized advice based on the individual’s health condition.

Pre-Flight Precautions

1. Pain Management
Individuals with severe ear infections should take pain relief medication as recommended by their healthcare provider before the flight to mitigate discomfort during travel.

2. Ear Protection
Wearing earplugs or using specialized ear protection devices can help reduce the impact of pressure changes during the flight.

Opting for flights during times of the day when the air pressure is relatively stable can minimize the challenges associated with severe ear infections. Early morning flights are often recommended.

Informing Airline Staff

Informing airline staff about the condition before boarding allows for better assistance and accommodations during the flight. Airlines are equipped to handle medical situations and can provide additional support if necessary.

Conclusion

In conclusion, traveling with a severe ear infection requires careful consideration of potential risks and precautionary measures. By consulting with medical professionals, taking necessary precautions, and choosing optimal travel times, individuals can make informed decisions that prioritize their health and well-being.

Remember, prioritizing health is paramount, and with the right precautions, individuals can make travel decisions that align with their well-being. Safe travels!

20 thoughts on “Flying with Eustachian Tube Dysfunction: Best Tips”

  1. This is for Rachel.I have a permanent echo in my hearing that makes sound distort and speech is not clear.I been to doctor but they seem to just recommend a hearing aid which just magnified the sound .I feel that the echo has to do with Eustachian problem sound has not ways of dispersing so echo is the result Example:If I am in a long room and I yell I get the sound to bounce back so this produces echo.I feel that the Eustachian tube make sound to disperse, but if for some reason it is clogged up then Echo is the result.I may not have that but why do I have this Resonance inside my head when I talk or I hear speech.I am guessing here I am not a Otorhinolaryngologist.

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  2. I have had this problem for 10 years and tinnitus too. I was given an MRI scan to see if the tinnitus was a brain problem as it was in one ear only, but was told no problem with the brain. However, I was sent on my way and have had tinnitus and can't pop my ears for 10 years. A month ago I was told by the woman who does ear wax suction that my eardrums weren't looking right and to see ENT. The doctor said my eardrums looked ok but I insisted as I was told by this lady to see an ENT specialist. Eventually he did a referral. I have been to my surgery twice over the years about my tinnitus as I don't sleep well. I was told there was nothing they could do and that I should keep trying to hold my breath and pop my ears. My doctor said there is nothing they can do for tinnitus. Apparently, they could have referred me years ago to check my Eustachian tube but hey ho do they really care. My doctor wouldn't know me if I walked past him in the street. Just an example – I broke my right ankle twice in 2 years and 18 months later on a visit the doctor apologised because a letter had been sent from the hospital saying I needed to be on Vitamin D 3 morning and night as I was halfway to Osteopenia. So 18 months later I must be a lot worse. The letter that the hospital sent to my GP had been filed away without informing me. Also, I was not told to take K-2 with the vitamin D3 which I have learned from doctors on YouTube that too much D3 will cause hardening of the arteries due to the calcium. When I asked my doctor if it was ok to take K-2 he said he didn't know much about vitamins even though he had prescribed D3. I hate to complain but I seem to get ignored for some reason. I had a foot correction operation a few years ago and was told not to eat until the operation from 6 a.m. It was 6pm that night when they operated and left me overnight in a room on my own and nobody brought me a cup of tea or a biscuit. I felt sick with hunger but my husband looked everywhere but all the staff had gone. No Nurse, No one in the kitchen. I never got any breakfast or a cup of tea. I rang my husband to come and get me and I left in tears with the receptionist chasing after me and sitting in the car to try to cover up their mistakes. On my return for a checkup, the surgeon said that no x-ray had been taken before my operation and he was furious. I think he was annoyed at me actually but I didn't know I should have had an x-ray. I live in the UK. Sorry to go on but your YouTube has made me realise I am not getting the proper care. I am waiting to see the ENT.

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  3. I’m not really convinced on the use of nasal steroid use. She hast explained why this would work. Usually the dysfunction would go on it’s own accord after a few weeks anyway.
    No mention of Otovent or any other air procedure? Usually this has a better result.

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  4. I’m really worried that my symptoms could be something more serious… how common is cancer in the ears? 2 rounds of amoxicillin, Flonase and momentasone , and I have found NO relief. I feel a pressure at the base of my skull that is worse with bending down / laying down, only in my left ear. I went completely deaf in my right ear yesterday. It was terrifying.

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  5. So you waste time and money by recommending Flonase, which by the way is useless. I have Eustachian Tube dysfunction..among some other ear issues due to the Dysfunction. My ENT put tubes in right away, those didn't work for me…next step is to try the balloon. You advice is horrible for being such a well known establishment.

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  6. I’ve had etd for about 5 months now. My left ear had so much pressure, my right ear felt like fluid was filling up. Dr prescribed antibiotics and steroids. I think mine came from inhaling some dust particles at an old job. There’s not a lot of pressure in my right ear, it has gotten better but still bothers me. My right ear has gotten better too, I still feel fluid build up every once in awhile but I just mess with my ear and it drains. I still get pressure in my forehead and nose. I heard red light therapy helps to heal etd, there’s a guy on YouTube who explains how it healed him. Ordered mine yesterday, hopefully it will help to heal it permanently. It’s really messing with my life. Praying for everyone to start healing!!!!

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  7. Which procedure do you find to be more effective? The balloon dilation or the tube insertion? I have had ETD since 2019 and have tried every OTC treatment option with no relief. I want to get a procedure done, but want to pick the one with the most promise and make sure I can afford it as well.

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  8. like last month i went to the snow and we went high in the mountains which made my ears pop it was so painful even worse than the airplane and i think my ears are still recovering from that

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  9. I've been experiencing problems with my hearing for years now – i believe this is the answer i was looking for but i'm not sure if its euschian tube disorder. Basically everytime I swallow anything (ex. food, water, or even saliva) i hear a like a click or pop, or more like i wanna say, a brief crackling sound? I wouldn't say that my hearing is muffled, but it does feel like theres something in my ear that's affecting my hearing- for instance to me, it sounds as if I'm talking in a moderate, loud enough voice but others say i talk sorta quiet or in unclear voice. Or whenever someone is talking to me, i tend to mishear things alot of times

    But anway, i experience the pop sounds in both my ears. The first time i experienced the pop/crackling sound whenever i swallowed was when i got back home from swimming one day. I was pretty young at the time, but i noticed it and went for a checkup few times at the doctors but they would always say that theres nothing wrong with my ears.
    There was this one time where i sneezed and my right ear felt like it became unblocked, and i could hear normally as i did before for a brief moment, but the 2nd time i sneezed right after, it got blocked again (this happened over random day after a few months). It's frustrating cause i don't know what this is, and it's hard to put into words but i still experience this problem

    Also my ear sometimes feels like its building pressure and becomes stuffy randomly, so everything starts sounding muffled and it doesnt clear easily. I've also recently started experiencing pressure in my ears whenever im riding in a car which never really happened before and it just doesn't seem to go away, and i feel that my hearing is starting to get worse, as in blocked/muffled that i can't hear click or pop sounds when i swallow things (i'm not sure how to explain it that well 😓 – but i hope it makes somewhat sense)

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  10. Hello! I’ve been having dizzy episodes & feeling off balance since December 2022. I finally went & saw an ENT specialist. She checked both ears & said my ears looked good & saw no fluid BUT I SOMETIMES FEEL FLUID IN BOTH OF MY EARS. Like, it’s stuck…like it wants to come out but won’t. I did an audio test & passed with flying colors. The ENT specialist looked up my nose & said that my nose was very inflamed, which can cause my Eustachian tubes to swell. So, she prescribed me prednisone. I don’t know if the prednisone is working or not…today is just Day 6 of 12. However, I’m still experiencing dizziness & imbalance. It is the absolute worse. It has caused me to have extreme anxiety & panic attacks. I’m in need of relief! I do not want to have to deal with this any longer. Anybody dealt with something similar?

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  11. my ENT diagnosed this last month after 5 years. Problem is im deaf in the opposite ear so shes advising against any surgery so all im doing is inflating my ears by popping but its not doing much if anything.

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